Choosing the Right Tires

Buying new tires for your motorcycle can be one of the most difficult purchases to make. We're here to help you make that decision easier.

There are a few questions to ask yourself when buying new tires. Knowing the answers to these questions will help you decide what tires are best for you. The questions are:

Tire Replacement Tips

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Do I want the same tires that I currently have?

If you just want to replace your worn tires with the same model, the task of buying tires is simple. Shop using our make/model/year feature to select your motorcycle. If we have the OEM tires in stock (and we most likely do) it's as simple as adding them to your cart and checking out! If there are multiple tires to choose from, just take a look at your existing tires, write down the brand, name and size of your tires, and you can refine your results using that information.

Do I know what size tires I need?

If you know what size tires you need, you're off to a good start. If you don't know what size tires you need, you can get the sizes from the existing tires on your bike, or from the owner's manual if you have it. You can also use our make/model/year feature, which will automatically narrow tire results to tires that will fit your motorcycle.

There are multiple tire size numbering systems, and it can get pretty confusing. For the scoop on sizes, check out our Tire Size Explanation Guide.

What type of bike do I have?

Do you have a cruiser? Or may be a sport bike? With so many types of bikes on the market, including the laid back cruisers and customs, large touring bikes, sport bikes, dual-sports, sport-touring rigs, motocrossers, trail bikes, scooters and more, it's good to know what you have. That way you won't end up with road race tires on your Gold Wing.

What type of riding do I typically do?

If you spend the majority of your riding time on a race track, a purpose built track tire will suit you more than a mile-eating touring tire. Conversely, if you spend hours in the saddle without stopping except for gas, a tire that can go long distances is more up your alley. Then there are the in-betweens...

If you have a sport or sport-touring bike, don't spend much or any time at the track, and you like to ride a few hundred miles a day, including slabbing it to get to your favorite set of twisties, a sport tire that can go long distances could be what you're looking for. These are sport-touring tires. They're not quite as sticky as the latest and greatest sport compounds, but you'll get more miles out of them, and they'll still perform well once you get to the good roads.

On the dirt side... take a look at what type of terrain you'll be riding. If it's hard packed or rocky terrain, go for hard terrain tire. Soft stuff? Get a soft terrain tire, and if it's in-between or a little of everything, go for an intermediate or all terrain tire.